About Nepal

About 22 % of Nepal’s total land mass is covered by protected areas in the form of national parks, wildlife sanctuaries, hunting reserves and conservation areas. Nepal comes only second to Brazil in terms of water resources and having possessed the longest chain of Hindu Kush Himalayan belt makes it a perennial source of fresh water.

About 22 % of Nepal’s total land mass is covered by protected areas in the form of national parks, wildlife sanctuaries, hunting reserves and conservation areas. Nepal comes only second to Brazil in terms of water resources and having possessed the longest chain of Hindu Kush Himalayan belt makes it a perennial source of fresh water.

The geography of the country runs from flat lands terrain just above 100m from sea level and mid-hills to the world’s towering Himalayas within a distance of 200m. The landscape is entirely dotted by lush natural vegetation and numerous rivers and lakes. Its vegetation ranges from tropical and alpine to temperate that provide the most suitable habitat for some of the world’s rarest and finest flora and fauna species including one horned rhinoceros, red pandas, blue sheep, Asian elephants, rhododendrons and tulips. More than 853 species of birds have been recorded while the population of Royal Bengal tigers has been increasing. The breeding and translocation of one horned Rhinos and Gharial Crocodile are some exemplary conservation successes in Nepal.

It is also this remarkably stark geographical variation that has led to Nepalese ethnic and cultural diversity. In Nepal an estimated 100 ethnic groups having varied traditional roots and lifestyles live in mutual respect and harmony. Rais and Limbus in the east to Khas and Kshatriyas in the west, from Newars of the Kathmandu valley to Tamangs of surrounding districts, from Madhesis and Tharus of Terai to Gurungs and Sherpas in the Himalayas, all represent the different colors and cultures of this country. Each community has its own rite and ritual, religion, dress code, ideals and values but it is the pride of being Nepali that has been the strongest bond of unity.

But all of this natural and cultural characters are fast changing in the face of globalization. The uncontrollable growth in population has been a constant threat to nature and ecology worldwide. Natural landscapes are being fast transformed into vast tracts of barren land due to deforestation and farming. Logging has been a major problem in the world at large along with cultivation to increase food production. River pollution and management of solid waste are some of daunting challenges of growing cities like Kathmandu, Pokhara, Butwal and Janakpur. The release of toxic and harmful chemicals and gases like Sulphur Dioxide and Nitrous oxide into water and air has adversely affected the health of all living things.

Problems like these do not remain peculiar or specific only to Nepal, but its effects in an underdeveloped country do have a serious extent. So it in this light and with the inspiration to prevent and preserve both environment and culture from further deterioration as well as helping the deprived population that HECAC has been established. We rely upon the help of like minded individuals willing to contribute to our cause and turn this planet into a better place. HECAC is a non profit community based organization formed to conduct various programs at national and regional level. HECAC focuses on promoting a wide participation of villagers and tourists, professionals and public and media and government on a voluntary basis.

About Nepal

About 22 % of Nepal’s total land mass is covered by protected areas in the form of national parks, wildlife sanctuaries, hunting reserves and conservation areas. Nepal comes only second to Brazil in terms of water resources and having possessed the longest chain of Hindu Kush Himalayan belt makes it a perennial source of fresh water.

About 22 % of Nepal’s total land mass is covered by protected areas in the form of national parks, wildlife sanctuaries, hunting reserves and conservation areas. Nepal comes only second to Brazil in terms of water resources and having possessed the longest chain of Hindu Kush Himalayan belt makes it a perennial source of fresh water.

The geography of the country runs from flat lands terrain just above 100m from sea level and mid-hills to the world’s towering Himalayas within a distance of 200m. The landscape is entirely dotted by lush natural vegetation and numerous rivers and lakes. Its vegetation ranges from tropical and alpine to temperate that provide the most suitable habitat for some of the world’s rarest and finest flora and fauna species including one horned rhinoceros, red pandas, blue sheep, Asian elephants, rhododendrons and tulips. More than 853 species of birds have been recorded while the population of Royal Bengal tigers has been increasing. The breeding and translocation of one horned Rhinos and Gharial Crocodile are some exemplary conservation successes in Nepal.

It is also this remarkably stark geographical variation that has led to Nepalese ethnic and cultural diversity. In Nepal an estimated 100 ethnic groups having varied traditional roots and lifestyles live in mutual respect and harmony. Rais and Limbus in the east to Khas and Kshatriyas in the west, from Newars of the Kathmandu valley to Tamangs of surrounding districts, from Madhesis and Tharus of Terai to Gurungs and Sherpas in the Himalayas, all represent the different colors and cultures of this country. Each community has its own rite and ritual, religion, dress code, ideals and values but it is the pride of being Nepali that has been the strongest bond of unity.

But all of this natural and cultural characters are fast changing in the face of globalization. The uncontrollable growth in population has been a constant threat to nature and ecology worldwide. Natural landscapes are being fast transformed into vast tracts of barren land due to deforestation and farming. Logging has been a major problem in the world at large along with cultivation to increase food production. River pollution and management of solid waste are some of daunting challenges of growing cities like Kathmandu, Pokhara, Butwal and Janakpur. The release of toxic and harmful chemicals and gases like Sulphur Dioxide and Nitrous oxide into water and air has adversely affected the health of all living things.

Problems like these do not remain peculiar or specific only to Nepal, but its effects in an underdeveloped country do have a serious extent. So it in this light and with the inspiration to prevent and preserve both environment and culture from further deterioration as well as helping the deprived population that HECAC has been established. We rely upon the help of like minded individuals willing to contribute to our cause and turn this planet into a better place. HECAC is a non profit community based organization formed to conduct various programs at national and regional level. HECAC focuses on promoting a wide participation of villagers and tourists, professionals and public and media and government on a voluntary basis.